People Who Live in Glass Houses

This is the fifth post of seven, each a response to Kate Shrewsday’s request for an itinerary of MTM’s Seven Architectural Wonders. Each text post has a corollary visual post; the text and image posts will alternate between the blogs of Kate Shrewsday and the Andra Watkins. Since I (MTM) am no longer a paid pedant, I will try to make these as entertaining and enlightening as possible in 600 words or less. One ground rule: I cannot include a work of architecture I have not experienced directly and personally, just as one’s list of Great Books should not include a book one hasn’t yet read.
To read the text on the Maison de Verre for this fifth post please click here!

Maison de Verre lit up like a paper lantern

A glass volume inserted into an old Paris flat

The entry is another glass box inserted

The main stair descends like a drawbridge protecting the privacy of above

A room of light, books and elegance

Another stair literally descends to gain access to the boudoir

Walls of built-ins that slide, rotate and transform

Under construction…the tenant above refused to move, so they built underneath

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26 thoughts on “People Who Live in Glass Houses

    1. It is quite the intricate little jewel…photos can never do it justice. Not sure if it is still open, but you used to be able to book tours.

  1. A bespoke life jacket: A tailored piece of couture to fit two lives perfectly and exactly, and with Parisian taste and grace. You have told the story of the two people who lived here, woven together bricks, glass and mortar with sinew and bone so that I am not sure where some end and others begin, today. Such a piece of writing,such people, and such a building.

    1. The outside is better in person, I believe…the windows to the garden allow views, while the courtyard is more private, given that other apartments also face into the courtyard.

  2. I’ve always had these crazy ideas for my ideal home, and they involve a lot of glass, usually on a hill top so as to give the impression of vast open space, but I also worried about privacy, especially in this age of telephoto lenses, camera in everything and upcoming drones.

  3. What a beautiful place in which to live. I can’t begin to imagine the cost of such a project. Also, could you imagine the cost of having all that glass cleaned on a regular basis?!

  4. Good pick, MTM

    We just watched Extreme Homes (Alaska, France, California, Canada, etc.). Several of the featured homes were “glass houses” . . . beautiful views out (but I’d be nervous about peeping Toms looking in). 😉

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